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On 10 July 2009 Steve Kehlet said: For a while I’ve been reading I Love Typography, which describes itself as a means of bringing the subject of Typography to the masses. I am definitely part of the masses, I know I don’t have the critical eye and patience needed for good page design, as made evident by my site with its uninspired look, horrible colors, blocky layout, and general failure to render properly in any browser but Safari. But as I Love Typography says, it is truly inspiring at times to see these beautiful fonts and what people have done with them. Each article showcases numerous typefaces and sometimes works of art created with them. It’s a fascinating read on a beautiful topic I now realize I know so little about.” So he starts to look at it:

For the full story, see 1 <3 Typography and the I Love Typography site.

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To follow are excerpts from the forward to Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Simone Beck, Louisette Bertholle, and Julia Child 1963 version, Alfred A Knopf publishers in New York.

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To

La Belle France

WHOSE PEASANTS, FISHERMAN, HOUSEWIVES,

AND PRINCES – NOT TO MENTION HER CHEFS -

THROUGH GENERATIONS OF INVENTIVE AND

LOVING CONCENTRATION HAVE CREATED ONEOF THE WORLD’S GREATEST ARTS

Recipe language is always a sort of short hand in which a lot of information is packed, and you will have to read carefully if you are not to miss small but important points. Then, to build up your over-all knowledge of cooking, compare the recipe mentally to others you are familiar with, and note where one recipe of technique fits into the larger picture of theme and variations.

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Building AWOL of Understanding and Compassion
William T. Wiley
at the Marsha Mateyka Gallery

 

A pot saver is a self-hampering cook. Use all the pans, bowls, and equipment you need, but soak them in water as soon as you are through with them. Clean up after yourself frequently to avoid confusion.

ForcedConfusion

Forced Confusion by JavaJive on Flickr

Cross references are always a problem. If there are not enough, you may miss an important point, and if there are too many you will become enraged. Yet if every technique is explained every time it comes up, a short recipe is long, and a long one forbidding.

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Figure 6 Dual Modality [149] Peripheral Vascular Sonography Joseph F. Polak

 

 

Each of the several steps in the process, though simple to accomplish, plays a critical role, and if any is eliminated or combined with another, the texture and taste …of the navarin…suffer, One of the main reasons that psuedo-French cooking, with which we are all too familiar, falls far below good French cooking is just this matter of elimination of steps, combinations of processes, or skimping on ingredients such as butter, cream – and time. “Too much trouble,” “Too expensive,” or “Who will know the difference” are death knells for good food.

 

A complete treatise on French cooking following the detailed method we have adopted would be about the size of an unabridged dictionary; even printed on Bible paper, it would have to be placed on a stand.

STARTING TO LOOK FOR IMAGES/METAPHORS FOR SKIPPING STEPS IN THE DIGITAL AGE…

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Krzysztof Penderecki communicates flow in his musical compositions through his own annotation system. Eventually his drawings are translated into traditional notes and lines so performers can play the work. But for his own purposes, and maybe to explain the details and overall patterns to performers and patrons – Penderecki’s own system captures his ideas best.

The scores above are from wood s lot, Sinepost, and the gallery of music at WFMU.
A set of images from Mattmo‘s Inspiration Set on Flickr are presented in contrast below. They also capture flow. At one point maybe only to the artist or mathematicians but at some point later, perhaps to others interpreting or performing the work…..maybe even machines performing work that has a flow.

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